Ceramic Tile That Looks Like Hardwood Flooring

Lindsay ~ 3 July 2007

The best way to get the genuine look of hardwood flooring is to, well, install hardwood floors. But wood can be on the expensive side, so many homeowners look for alternatives. Also, it’s not always a good fit in a bathroom, kitchen, or other areas that might see frequent moisture. Likewise, laminate flooring can warp if it gets wet often. That’s why ceramic tiles are popular in bathrooms, entryways, and kitchens. But most of them don’t look much like wood. Except this one:

The Woodlands 6×20 Interceramic ceramic tiles come in styles that mimic hardwood floors. They have cherry, maple, sherwood, chestnut, and oak. “The wood look gives the room a warm, familiar atmosphere that is inviting and after all the guests have left, the easy maintenance of ceramic floor will make sure you don’t spend all night cleaning.” (as if I would have spent all night cleaning anyway)

$4 a square foot at Barefoot Floors

wood-look-ceramic-tile.jpg

Comments

sherrie

16 December

what kind of grout do you use on tile that looks like wood?

Mark

17 December

This stuff is great. I have been seeing more and more of this material because many of my contracting clients are requesting to have it installed in their homes. If you like tile, and know how to install it, and also like the look of hardwood floors this would be great for your home!

hobart welders

4 February

This is a great alternative to hardwood floor!
I’m surprised that they actually have that many colors as well…
I’m definitely gonna check it out.

Eric Hurst

16 June

I’m a wood floor guy by trade, so perhaps I’m a littly bit biased, but I’ve seen tile that mimics hardwood a few times, and each time I thought it looked terrible. But that’s just me, there is a buyer out there for pretty much anything a manufacturer offers, so naturally “hardwood tile” is going to end up in a few houses, but I would expect to see it become wildly popular. To REALLY look like wood, you would need to have some longer pieces, and the longer the tile, the more susceptible it is to breaking, cracking, etc…